Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

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Re: Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

Postby model murdering » Fri Jun 23, 2017 10:41 pm

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Sybil started life as a wrecked AFX Model A panel that arrived without a roof. I didnt have a cognitive plan, other than inline power and a narrowed tail. Chassis began as an experimental Tyco mish mash, where I was playing with steering ideas. First cut was behind the doors, then a section cut in the rear to tighten her cheeks. Then I went mining in the slime green scrap pile for parts.




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Im a petty opportunist. A Capri rear section flipped up on it;s tail provided the rear corners for the tub.





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A slice off a Poison Pinto door made a nice rear frame connector. If ya cut it right, the original body mounts become stand offs for the inline motor.





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The Poison Pinto roof makes a perfect deck lid. It's chubby enough to bash around with the file to get the corners profiled nicely without extra filler.






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All the nibblets are file fit and bonded using Lime green AFX goop. I like to work in the original material, even on customs that will be painted conventionally. I have it in stock for restoration work anyway.






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I added the rear valence from the Poison Pinto as well. Flipped upside down it made a nice rear cockpit apron.





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I snifed the header bow out of a mashed Baja ....





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.... then installed it as a dash panel. A companion to the rear apron, to tighten up a rather vague expanse left behind from the roof removal. Sometimes ya just gotta feel your way along.





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Once the dash set up, I added some filler to roll the cowl up, and alter the some what flat original styling.






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With that much solvent and liquid plastic in a small body, it's a good idea to step off and let things cure out. I worked out a drop spindle beam and frame rail clip. Same ole schtick, just narrowed slightly with the caster rolled back a bit to level the ride height.





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The front rims have locator lip to index the tire. It also works backwards for some old school finned drums. They began life as T-jet idler gears, that were center bored and rough filed for good bite. They simply press fit onto the hubs.





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A typical jam nut arrangement for a dummy motor. They change slightly from build to build, but the eye deer is always the same.





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Front and rear clips mounted together.





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Strangely after the mating process, I wound up with enough room for a firewall. It may seem fussy at H0 scale, but they sell the look in the end.





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I usually try and keep things simple, but I wasnt really in control of this build anymore. It took on a life of it's own. I worked out a jail bar insert for the grill.






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A standard AFX chrome grill is stripped. The headlamps are bobbed off, and the phony grill mesh is pared away. The bottom sill hides a severe back cut and a hidden back panel that allows the jail bars to slide up behind like an upside down guillotine.





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Provisions for a windshield include a paper clip and the left over body standoffs from the donor Pinto





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A little back relief on the mounts against the doors, allows the frame to slide up and down nicely.






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The glass is strip cut from an old cassette box. I heated it slowly over my soldering iron until it was wiggly, then contoured it to the frame. The a recess is cut around the glass to seat the paperclip frame. Tedious, but totally worth it. Polish as usual. Bulletproof!





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Sick of diecast "make due headers", I twisted up some pipes that pin into the engine block. When the mounting screw is tightened, they clamp the body down onto the chassis, using the lower cowling rail.





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Too much handling, and I finally busted off one of the cool chrome reverse Strommy air horns ..... grrrrrrr! To get out of jail ,I built a pair of injector racks from strip stock, and installed some implants to index the injector horns to follow.





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The headlamps, pared away earlier, are smoothed round and drilled to accept a regulation vertical bracket.





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Pick ups are braids slotted through a folded PTEG carrier, using a conventional pin. PTEG is tough as nails, lighter than a feather, cheaper than dirt, with stonewall insular properties. It is also held in place with the single mounting screw.





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A new chassis was nicked out from sheet stock.





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I painted this dumb thing two times (hence the name) before I settled on Hugger Orange Lacquer, about three coats to start an even color base. Each pass a little more liquid than the previous until it looks uniformly shiny/sticky.





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After the fourth coat, Testors Inca Gold is launched over a still wet, orange body. Less is more here! Its something you should practice at least once. The flakes should never touch each other. Clear is applied lightly while still in the flash to seal the flake down. After sufficient dry time liquid coats of clear are applied until smooth.





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Over glassy smooth clear, the vinyl flame licks lay out and adhere beautifully. The flame base is two coats of Testors Emerald Green metallic, with a dusting of Testors Lime Ice over the top for contrast. After peeling the stencils, the licks should be allowed to fully cure before dusting some clear over the top to seal them. After 24 hrs the model can be buried in clear again, for the liquid look. If you dont seal the licks, one could wash them off with the next liquid clear coat.





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Appointments are Chrome Alclad finished with Duplicolor clear.




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The widgets to finish were grubbed out of the scrap box, and fitted as required. Thanx for looking guys!
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Re: Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

Postby ShotgunDave » Sat Jun 24, 2017 12:18 am

Bravo!!! :clap: :clap: :clap:

This is my favorite one yet. Love that look from the front. Just wicked.
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Re: Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

Postby TuscoTodd » Sat Jun 24, 2017 6:44 am

That is just plain GORGEOUS! :P

Love the details of how you create these sir - a true inspiration!!!
:banana-dance:
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Re: Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

Postby model murdering » Mon Jun 26, 2017 12:01 am

Thanx for noticing "the line" Dave, you and the others here have always helped to fuel my madness. I loved the East Coast chopped and channeled look. I tried to keep things compressed, stay focused throughout, and not let too much of her get above the belt-line. You know the deal, LOL : Drawing the line is one thing, keeping it is quite another. :doh:

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Todd, glad you enjoy the play by play. I like including the widget list, so that other slotters might find something useful or adaptable for one of their builds. I believe that expressing the jumps of how we get from stage to stage is the most important part of the process.


I build other more normal cars too, and have restoration work cooking on the side, but nothing seems more fun/distracting than the junk box build ups. They take a while to sort out, and there is a fair amount of ebb and flow, sometimes the build outright stalls. I always have one or two going on the back burner, that I pick up or put down; as problems either arrive, or are solved. Some builds explode off the workbench with a life of their own, others become long and drawn out journeys, that test your patience and dedication. :think:
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Re: Model Murdering Garage: Why Be Normal?

Postby model murdering » Sun Dec 17, 2017 4:30 pm

It's been a while. Typically I take a hiatus from slotting at least once a year, only this year it lasted almost a year. Life conspires to upset the applecart, dontcha know? :violin:




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For starters I bent up and axle beam, tubular looking frame rails (actually solid), and a coupla backing plates. This version is actually a return to the original narrow rail module that allows the use of the existing pick ups.



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The rails simply index into holes on the front bulkhead of the forward magnet housing. The horizontal frame connector is bored a skoshe over size to allow some wiggle for adjustment, though typically it's not needed.



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Because this model uses only a slightly altered wheel base, the pick ups are proximal to the axle beam. Attention to potential shorting is critical. Although it looks a bit tight in macro, there's a 005" clearance between the face of pick up hanger windows and the axle beam, as well as a bit more (.025") between the window sides and the frame rails. No sparky sparky!



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Upon returning to the hobby some years back, one of my first altereds was a Woody wheelie car. The body still remains. The ill conceived construction caused it's imminent demise, but also was the birth of my mission to create functional and robust period hot rod stylings, that could take a licken.

While not readily obvious, I conservatively took about a third out of the total roof height, and matched the glass height. What was the floating rear chassis stand off is removed, leaving the large ovular hole. I prefer a more stable rear mount, so an extra chunk of Woody was bonded to the rear and slotted to accept the rear tail pan of the chassis, in a slip fit fashion. The factory uses the fender module to accommodate the front screw post for the humongous stock four gear "Specialty Chassis". The screw post is moved under the front cowling to allow the T-jet chassis to be channeled in and radically drop the ride height from the original gargantuan proportions.



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Viewed from the rear, you can just make out the added panel which creates the rear slip mount for the chassis. Rather than waste the detail, I turned it woodside out and dropped it down to help cover her skivvies. A rear roll pan for termites and dry rot.



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She looks snug, and is; but all the naughty bits tuck up underneath nicely. Load the chassis into the back cleats, tip the body down, then wind the screw in. For those familiar with the Aurora four gear models, all the wiggling, jiggling, and skewed body height is gone for good.



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Ya cant get a good pie crust in H0. My solution has been to re-purpose the venerable T-jet skinny tire. The tire is dropped into a water bottle plastic lid with a few drops of ATF. After it puffs up it can be mounted to a wheel or mandrel as required, blotted and then allowed to dry. Then it can be trued per normal. The retainer is just a nicked off straight sewing pin. I havent come up with a way to "crust" the rears, but the tall slicks arent a particularly bad look.



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I never measure much of anything. Typically I just match points, or cross match. I avoid it like the plague. At this scale, fractional errors are catastrophic when you're splitting millimeters, and diddling a few thousandths one way or the other. My builds come out better using a divider, a straight edge, and a scribe. All my mistakes and headaches went away, and the build time is notably shortened. Match, scratch, and move along.



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Nuthen real fancy on this one. Just a re-combooberation of the factory body parts to accommodate the earlier chassis.



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Typically I work with the coupe and sedan versions of the ATX Model A. A test mule on the Woody was just what I needed to get back into it.
There's still plenty of room to drop the ride height an 1/8" , as well as another good sized slice that can come out of the roof height. Im looking forward to a more radical revisit of the idea.

Thanks for riding along! :auto-driving:
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